Seed loss and volunteer seedling establishment of rapeseed in the northernmost European conditions: potential for weed infestation and GM risks

  • Pirjo Peltonen-Sainio
  • Katri Pahkala
  • Hannu Mikkola
  • Lauri Jauhiainen
Keywords: dormancy, GM, oilseed rape, seedling soil seed bank, spring sown crop, turnip rape, weed

Abstract

Rapeseed soil seed bank development and volunteer plant establishment represent substantial risk for crop infestation and GM contamination. This study was designed to complement such investigations with novel understanding from high latitude conditions. Four experiments were designed to characterise seed loss at harvest, persistence, viability and capacity for volunteer seedling establishment, as well as impact of management measures on soil seed bank dynamics. Oilseed rape was the primary crop investigated due to the availability of GM cultivars and because of the increasing importance. Harvest losses and soil seed bank development were significant. Volunteer seedlings emerged at reasonably high rates, especially in the first autumn after harvest, but about 10% of buried seeds maintained their viability for at least three years. Soil incorporation methods had no major effect on numbers of volunteer seedlings, but herbicide treatments controlled volunteer seedlings efficiently, though not completely, due to irregular timing of seedling emergence.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Section
Articles
Published
Dec 8, 2014
How to Cite
Peltonen-Sainio, P., Pahkala, K., Mikkola, H., & Jauhiainen, L. (2014). Seed loss and volunteer seedling establishment of rapeseed in the northernmost European conditions: potential for weed infestation and GM risks. Agricultural and Food Science, 23(4), 327-339. https://doi.org/10.23986/afsci.41530