Back to the Roots, the Origins and the Beginning: Reflections on Revival (tajdīd) in Islamic Discourse

Authors

  • Abdulkader Tayob University of Cape Town

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.33356/temenos.48462

Keywords:

Islam, Revival, Discourse, Hadīth, Intertextuality

Abstract

Revival takes on many different forms in Muslim societies. This article explores and identifies a ḥadīth discourse of revival, based on a famous ḥadīth and its commentary that promises renewal at the head of every century. Using an inter-textual analysis, it argues that revival was rooted in the first crisis faced by the early Muslim community when the Prophet died and could no longer personally guide Muslims. Across time and place, the discourse of revival confronts this original crisis by naming and renaming it, and offering a resolution. I also suggest that the first crisis was beyond resolution, as according to Muslim belief the prophetic line of succession ended with Muhammad. The discourse of revival thus became potentially recurrent, as resolution was always prone to disruption.

Author Biography

Abdulkader Tayob, University of Cape Town

Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Cape Town

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Published

2015-01-07

How to Cite

Tayob, A. (2015). Back to the Roots, the Origins and the Beginning: Reflections on Revival (tajdīd) in Islamic Discourse. Temenos - Nordic Journal of Comparative Religion, 50(2), 257–271. https://doi.org/10.33356/temenos.48462

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Section

Articles