What does it mean to ‘eat Jewishly?’: authorizing discourse in the Jewish food movement in Toronto, Canada

  • Aldea Mulhern University of Toronto
Keywords: Food -- Religious aspects -- Judaism, Eating and meals, Diet, Jewish Cooking, Food habits, Nutrition, Jews -- Canada, Environmentalism, Implicit religion, Jewish law

Abstract

This article examines the development of ‘eating Jewishly’ among participants at Shoresh Jewish Environmental Programs in Toronto, Canada. Participants at Shoresh construct and draw upon Jewish tradition in order to resolve gaps between the is and the ought of the conventional food system, and to a lesser extent, the narrower food system of kashrut. ‘Eating Jewishly’ re-positions religious orthodoxy as one in a set of authorizing discourses, subsuming all Jewish eating acts under one rubric. ‘Eating Jewishly’ thus departs from standard narratives of Jewish eating as either eating kosher, or eating traditional Jewish foods. I use a theory of authorizing discourse to show the conditions of possibility through which Shoresh develops their intervention as Jewish. I conclude that such authorization practices are a key form of productive constraint in the formation of Shoresh’s lived religion, and in the formation of religion as a framework for social good. 
Section
Articles
Published
Apr 13, 2015
How to Cite
Mulhern, A. (2015). What does it mean to ‘eat Jewishly?’: authorizing discourse in the Jewish food movement in Toronto, Canada. Scripta Instituti Donneriani Aboensis, 26, 326-48. https://doi.org/10.30674/scripta.67460