A review of risk prioritisation schemes of pathogens, pests and weeds: principles and practices

  • J. HEIKKILÄ

Abstract

Societys resources are scarce, and biosecurity actions need to be targeted and prioritised. Various models have been developed that prioritise and rank pests and diseases according to the risks they represent. A prioritisation model allows utilisation of scientific, ecological and economic information in decision-making related to biological hazards. This study discusses such models and the properties associated with them based on a review of 78 prioritisation studies. The scope of the models includes all aspects of biosecurity (human, animal and plant diseases, and invasive alien species), but with an emphasis on plant health. The geographical locations of the studies are primarily North America, Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Half of the studies were conducted during the past five years. The review finds that there generally seems to be several prioritisation models, especially in the case of invasive plants, but only a select few models are used extensively. Impacts are often accounted for in the model, but the extent and economic sophistication of their inclusion varies. Treatment of uncertainty and feasibility of control was lacking from many studies.;
Section
Articles
Published
Dec 4, 2008
How to Cite
HEIKKILÄ, J.. A review of risk prioritisation schemes of pathogens, pests and weeds: principles and practices. Agricultural and Food Science, [S.l.], v. 20, n. 1, p. 15-28, dec. 2008. ISSN 1795-1895. Available at: <https://journal.fi/afs/article/view/6003>. Date accessed: 17 dec. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.2137/145960611795163088.