Fertilization effects of organic waste resources and bottom wood ash: results from a pot experiment

  • Eva Brod Bioforsk – Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Soil and Environment Division
  • Trond Knapp Haraldsen Bioforsk – Norwegian Institute for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Soil and Environment Division
  • Tor Arvid Breland Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences

Abstract

We conducted a pot experiment to study the fertilization effects of four N- and P-rich organic waste resources alone and in combination with K-rich bottom wood ash at two application rates (150 kg N ha–1 + 120 kg K ha–1, 300 kg N ha-1 + 240 kg K ha–1). Plant-available N was the growth-limiting factor. 48–73% of N applied with meat and bone meal (MBM) and composted fish sludge (CFS) was taken up in aboveground biomass, resulting in mineral fertilizer equivalents (MFE%) of 53–81% for N uptake and 61–104% for yield. MFE% of MBM and CFS decreased for increasing application rates. Two industrial composts had weak N fertilization effects and are to be considered soil conditioners rather than fertilizers. Possible P and K fertilization effects of waste resources were masked by the soil’s ability to supply plant-available P and K, but effects on plant-available P and K contents in soil suggest that the waste resources may have positive effects under more nutrient-deficient conditions.

Keywords: meat and bone meal, fish sludge, wood ash, compost, nitrogen use efficiency, phosphorus

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Section
Articles
Published
Dec 18, 2012
How to Cite
Brod, E., Haraldsen, T., & Breland, T. A. (2012). Fertilization effects of organic waste resources and bottom wood ash: results from a pot experiment. Agricultural and Food Science, 21(4), 332-347. https://doi.org/10.23986/afsci.5159